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Welcome!

The January 2015 edition of the LET 'EM RUN FOUNDATION Newsletter - Mustang Messenger - can be found here.

Our information brochure is here.

Please view our 8 1/2 x 11" information flyer here.


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Let 'Em Run is an all volunteer 501(c)(3) organization. All funds received are used to preserve, recover, provide sanctuary and homes for Virginia Range horses.

You can help by donating at the link below:

Donations can be mailed to:

Let 'em Run Foundation
106 Deschutes Dr
Dayton NV 89403


Rojo and Waylon's Bands


The horses of Nevada's Virginia Range, the largest free-roaming herd left in the country, does not benefit from federal protection.  They rely primarily on the work performed by a consortium of allied non-profit horse groups for their protection and the placement of horses that are removed from the range.  They are often described by the locals as "The Forgotten Herd."

Recently a couple of significant and potentially tragic events have occurred involving these horses that have challenged the allied groups.  Here is what has occurred, what we're doing about it and how you can help.


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" The Forgotten Herd"

With all the public concern about America's wild horses and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM,) the herd that actually started the wild horse protection movement, Nevada's Virginia Range horses, has largely been overlooked.




In 1950 Velma "Wild Horse Annie" Johnston, a diminutive Reno secretary and dude ranch owner who had been compromised by polio, became incensed when she followed an overcrowded truck full of Virginia Range horses that was dripping blood onto the highway.  Johnston's ultimate achievement was the Wild Free-roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971, unanimously passed by Congress and signed into law by President Nixon.  However, this federal law did not apply to the very herd of horses that first caught Johnston's attention as they ranged on private and state lands, not on federally designated herd areas. 

The Virginia Range horses became the responsibility of the Nevada Department of Agriculture (NDA.)  Under current policies, NDA offers horses that they remove from the range to qualified non-profit "cooperators" where they can be placed in sanctuary or with qualified adopters.  However, under state law if the horses are not placed, NDA is required to sell or otherwise dispose of horses that are not placed with cooperators.  Thus the allied nonprofit groups are often busy taking in and placing horses if they can.

2015 DEVELOPMENTS

Two recent events have challenged the allies.  NDA had removed 19 horses (three family bands) that were currently in the state corrals, and the allies discovered that an established Nevada sanctuary, the Nevada B Mustang Sanctuary, had made plans to ship all of its horses to a livestock auction in Mira Loma, CA, that based on multiple reports was frequented by "kill buyers."  Several of the groups (including Let 'Em Run) had placed horses with Nevada B.  The groups had a duty to both the horses and their contributors who expected those groups to exercise due diligence to protect the horses.  They went to court, obtained a temporary restraining order, and the Judge facilitated the allied groups' buyback of their horses as well as purchase of all of the others that were at risk, a total of 54 horses.  At the same time the groups were still working to take in the 19 horses standing in the state corrals.

These efforts have been very challenging and are naturally producing significant unanticipated expenses.  Ojai based Wildhorses in Need purchased the Nevada B horses and covered various start-up expenses.  Let 'Em Run is collecting donations to cover pasture rent, hay and various logistic expenses.  The Nevada B horses are presently in a large pasture with rolling hills, tree cover and year-round natural water.  Some of the older horses will need to stay in permanent sanctuary pasture.  The younger horses will be evaluated for potential adoption.


The horses in the state corrals are still awaiting the allies removing them to safety.  The groups are presently working on those issues.

HOW YOU CAN HELP

*  You can make a contribution to cover these horses' expenses.
*  You can help us locate appropriate permanent sanctuaries for the horses that need to go to sanctuaries.
*  You can adopt a horse and provide a permanent home.
*  You can help spread the word among people who may be willing to donate, provide sanctuary space or adopt a horse.

Undoubtedly there will be additional horses being brought in during 2015 that will need to be taken in by the allied groups.  Helping get these present activities on-track will help preserve the groups' abilities to deal humanely with future horse issues.

PREVIOUS RESCUE ACTIVITIES


Least Resistance Training Concepts doing what they do best!!


Purchase some LERF merchandise to donate to our Hay Emergency Fund

Buy it Here! (Click Album Cover)



Lacy and Dale Poune sing "Ode to Slaughterhouse Sue and the Butcherin' Crew"


A visit with Shirley Allen at LRTC's Orphan Foal Project. Call (775) 246-7636 for more information.


The LET 'EM RUN FOUNDATION is a nonprofit organization in partnership with government, business and community, committed to the protection and preservation of wild horses and the heritage of the American West.

Please view our IRS 501(c)(3) statement here.


See them larger!


Please take a moment and view the exciting poster and print created for the Marathon De Mayo in Reno a number of years ago by the talented Bonnie Adams and Kenneth Freeman. Also on view is the incredible print from the very talented Diana Wyles of Oroville, CA. These items are being made available on a limited edition basis. Please view them here.

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Please feel free to contact us should you have any questions about our site.

Thanks for stopping in!




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